Tawharanui Regional Park – The Other Days

Tawharanui Regional ParkWe kept thinking that the weather mightn’t hold. And were wanting to make the most of it while it lasted. July had been exceptional, and August was starting the same way. The biggest walk is to the eastern extremity, Tokatu Point. This is 3-4 hours and we decided that the day after our outing to Goat Island Marine Reserve was going to give us our best opportunity. And so it did; it was a sunny and warm day, albeit blustery.

Tawharanui Regional Park

Anchor Bay looking west – Tawharanui Regional Park

Tawharanui Regional Park

Anchor Bay looking east – Tawharanui Regional Park

Tawharanui Regional Park

Anchor Bay looking west – Tawharanui Regional Park. Omaha Beach in right distance

Tawharanui Regional Park

First lamb photo for a few days – Tawharanui Regional Park. Looking towards Tokatu Point

Tawharanui Regional Park

Off Tokatu Point Tawharanui Regional Park

Tawharanui Regional Park

Tawharanui Regional Park

Tawharanui Regional Park

Anchor Bay Tawharanui Regional Park

The next day was less energetic for us, catching up with washing and with the world. We still had an evening walk to the far end of Anchor Bay, to see what was around the corner (more headlands).

Tawharanui Regional Park

Anchor Bay Tawharanui Regional Park

Tawharanui Regional Park

Headland west end of Anchor Bay Tawharanui Regional Park

Tawharanui Regional Park

Anchor Bay Tawharanui Regional Park

Tawharanui Regional Park

Sunset Anchor Bay Tawharanui Regional Park

On our last day we went for a walk across the headland along the considerably misnamed Fishermans Track. It does give access to some good fishing I’m sure. But it is through some wonderful ancient forest occupied by some interesting birds. Tawharanui is another open sanctuary – like Shakespear. The peninsula is protected with a predator-free fence right across. Campers and visitors drive through an electric gate in the fence. There is a very active trapping programme inside the fence. There is a lot of planting of native species to provide habitat. And many bird species are making comebacks and others are being reintroduced.

On this last walk we saw brown teal Pateke ducks (4th rarest ducks on the planet), bellbirds (rare up north), New Zealand dotterel (threatened), kaka, whiteheads, red-crowned parakeets Kakariki, and saddlebacks. And our camping area was overrun with pukekos and fantails. It is a privilege to be able to camp and live and walk in a place like this.

Tawharanui Regional Park

Brown teal Pateke duck Tawharanui Regional Park

Tawharanui Regional Park

Wood Pidgeon Tawharanui Regional Park

Tawharanui Regional Park

Forest Tawharanui Regional Park. I half-expected to see a Moa or a dinosaur

Tawharanui Regional Park

Wyn on Fishermans Track Tawharanui Regional Park

Tawharanui Regional Park

Anchor Bay Tawharanui Regional Park

Gallery of photos – Tawharanui Regional Park –  Auckland – August 2013

Click on thumbnails to see full size. (And then you can click through them)

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